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Below is a snapshot of what we've been up to in 2017 and early 2018, 
with the most recent projects listed first:

SURFACE FAULTING HAZARDS AT THE KWISPAA LNG SITE, VANCOUVER ISLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA

Vancouver Island lies in the hanging wall of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, so future coseismic rupture on crustal faults is a concern. We used lidar DEMs, geophysical surveys, and field mapping to examine possible evidence for post-glacial displacement on 3 bedrock faults near the site. There was no geomorphic or stratigraphic evidence of such displacement.

LANDSLIDE HAZARD ASSESSMENT OF THE PROPOSED SITE OF THE KLOSER CABIN, RICHMOND HILL, ASPEN AREA, COLORADO

The Richmond Hill area north of the proposed cabin had been shown by previous GEO-HAZ mapping (done for Aspen Skiing Company) to contain some Quaternary landslides on the ridge flanks. We extended that mapping southward to the cabin site and identified some additional flank landslides with lidar and Google Earth. However, the cabin sits on an intact ridge of Ordovician Manitou Dolomite, which is not generally susceptible to slope failure in the Aspen area or elsewhere in Colorado. Bedrock strata beneath the cabin activity envelope dip west at 35°-40°, much steeper than the surface slopes of 13°-16°, meaning the beds do not “daylight” in the downslope direction, which further implies a very low potential for translational or wedge-failure landsliding.

GEOLOGY AND GEOLOGIC HAZARDS OF THE PROPOSED GOLDEN PEAK RACE TRAINING AREA, VAIL RESORT, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO (Final Revised Report)

A 2300 ft-long, dormant (Quaternary) landslide deposit lies south and west of the proposed new ski trails. This “Big Slide” deposit ranges from 50-80 ft thick, is relatively dry (only 1-3 ft of saturation in the bottom of the slide deposit), and apparently does not possess a low-strength, clayey basal shear plane. Computer slope stability analysis of the Big Slide, using minimum material strengths from borehole samples, indicates surprisingly high Factors of Safety (2.1-2.2 in its present condition, and 1.3 if the water table were to rise to the ground surface). Water table at time of drilling was 39 to 59 ft below surface. The estimated rise due to Spring snowmelt would equate an FOS of ~1.9. We concluded that the proposed Drainage Management Plan would result in groundwater rises very much smaller than needed to decrease current slide stability to failure levels.

REVIEW OF THE PAPER BY MULARGIA ET AL., 2017, “WHY IS PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS (PSHA) STILL USED?”; And Implications for the Proposed Olkiluoto High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository, Finland

The above paper recommends abandoning the PSHA methodology, which has been and is being used at the Finnish nuclear waste disposal site. We advised the Finnish nuclear regulator (STUK) that most of the post-2000 “failures” of PSHA can be attributed to bad data input in the SSC phase of the PSHA, and not to flaws in the PSHA method itself. Some recent “failures” of PSHA are due to its time-independent assumption for large earthquakes, but “work-arounds” do exist for making time-dependent PSHAs. None of the failures have arisen from fundamental laws in the Ground Motion Prediction phase of PSHA or from the mathematical algorithms of either the SSC or GMPE phases.

SOILS AND GEOTECHNICAL IMPACT OF 2017 PROPOSED MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS, CRESTED BUTTE MOUNTAIN RESORT, GUNNISON COUNTY, COLORADO

Of the 26 new bike trails proposed, our desktop study showed 2 had some potential risk related to slope stability of known landslides. In response CBMR shifted one trail and deleted the other. In the field visit on Sept. 27-28, 2017 we examined almost all proposed trail alignments near mapped landslides (Trails H, K, M, N, O P, Q, Va, Vb, W, X, Y, and Z).
We concluded that with judicious water management on these new bike trails, they will not result in any additional slope instability, just in the same way that the construction and operation of the existing (much larger) Bike Park on young and old landslide terrane has not triggered instability.